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for city elective office." because that presumes that that person has not yet qualified, and that the purpose of the endeavor is to have them be a qualified candidate. it's not to support the election of the that person. it's really more about getting them to be a qualified candidate and i'm actually thinking less about the draft someone over the summer or draft someone as a written that actually happened in 1999 in ammiano for mayor. i recall some of that, but try not to recall all of it this sec. you could have the same efforts that happened with "run he had run," and progress for all," in the context of a write-in campaign and i'm not sure under this definition it would get captured. that is why i'm hung up on qualification versus election. >> may i ask you a question about that? >> sure. >> it's not clear to me why that is materially different from what we have? >> well, again it's not necessarily the election of a person. that is not necessarily the goal of the committee or the committee would assert that is not their goal. it's to get them to run and, in fact
to be a caretaker who was to fill the vacancy until the next election could be held. there were at least three sump committees, i think maybe four and some of them raised good sums of money. and my concern was that they were functioning as campaigns without actually being campaigns. the commission decided that they weren't campaigns under current law. but i think the commission agreed that the raising and spending of that size of money was not designed by the voters to be something that went unregulated. so the commission directed the staff to put together some provisions that would, as i said, regulate committed are designed to draft, particularly those that raise tangible sums of money. the reason for that is that a citywide campaign aimed at a single person still reaches people citywide, and would conceivably impact their decisions at the polling place based on the fact that you get someone to run for office by extolling their virtues. so these rectally simple to follow will treat under our law, such campaigns, such committees, excuse me, as primarily formed campaigns and therefore, report th
presidential election in the united states. there were people people saying it's not this person. tim pawlenty drops off and michele bachmann drops off and left with a last person standing. it's not about picking a winner. it's picking losers. this is not the person. this is not the person. finally you get the last person standing. >> host: process of e elimination. >> which is consistent in whatever organization it is. i think it is in a sense is a simplified version of reality. i think you used a theory. theory start with simple and you make them more complex. if you take ge famous for the way it chooses lards. ge we always tell our students it's a company that works at practice but not in theory. it doesn't seem to do any of the things we say it should do. it's incredible profitable. if you have to pick them it's good at picking leaders. it's good at developing managers and picking the right people. ge spends twenty years selecting among the organization and slowly promoting them over and over and over again. and so the end of the day, twenty years, so you to work your way up. at the end of
>> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again today, with the emotional wounds from a school massacre still fresh. there were more fatal shootings, inclu
. when newt was elected to office in 1978 in georgia, his party, like the republican today was in wilderness. jimmy carter occupied the white house and both the house and senate were safefully democrat hands. the election of president reagan in 1980, republicans took control bows the white house and the senate. in the house, where gingrich went to work each day, he was badly outnumbered. i worked as a hill staffer for a congressman who had an office steps away from newt's. can assure you for representatives like newt, the minority was off in a lonely place. the republicans hasn't held a majority there since 1956. there was not a soul alive that could imagine a republican majority again. oh. except for newt. [laughter] with no seniority, but a tireless work ethic, a vision, and a mind filled with idea, it was newt gingrich who sat in the back bench of congress and meth devised a -- once again. it was gingrich that devised the famous contract with america. the plan that gave republicans more than something to run against in the historic 1994 election. he gave them something t
wanted to talk and i was running for office. we were in the same election, same ballot and it is easy as it is in san francisco politics to characterize people on either side of the aisle, and milton said "let me find out what this guy is about. let's talk" and that was very fitting because that's exactly how i knew him to operate as a public servant and a person. he wanted to talk about the china town campus and talk about my background. he asked if we should build a campus, and i said it's something that we should do and there was certainly overwhelming support for the campus, but characteristic of his style and his principles he was never afraid to question power, or to question the popular way, and he had many good points, and that was very typical of what i have known him to be as a servant at city college. it was very difficult in his position, often being the one vote out of seven, often finding rubber stamping of a decision, fighting the way we were spending our money for ten years. ten years he was in a position most of the time alone trying to speak up and say why are
, the republicans lose. and in a way that perhaps is more telling than just what one election result might suggest. >> well, i think it certainly does. and it gives him a certain platform and credibility that perhaps he didn't have before. but watching as these fiscal cliff negotiations have gone through the holidays, it certainly is perhaps a little bit more of a bully pulpit for the president and for his position on taxes. but i think the biggest story of the year came at the end of the year, in the past week or so. which is the massacre at the elementary school in sandy hook, newtown. those are the stories that barnicle and andrew have chosen as the top stories of 2012 to cover. mike barnicle, would you agree, that this could be his signature for his second term? >> i do. i do agree with that. i think the events of a few days ago in newtown, connecticut, will help shape a good portion of the president's second and final term in office. i think it gives us a huge impetus to changes in this country that had been, that have taken too long to take hold. i think the presidency itself, i think the ma
law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before t
elected, he would have strained things much better than they are now. that is part of the problem. host: what -- caller: character, honesty. host: mitt romney is your choice. caller: that is about it. host: patrick is next. caller: my political hero is president obama. host: why so? caller: he has gone through a lot. he has kept his cool during the course of the year. i look forward to him doing better. host: one thing that stands out as far as his accomplishments. caller: bringing the end to osama bin laden. i think he has done very well. he has been patient and the adult for working with the republicans that tried to make everything for the country. host: president obama amongst others being listed this morning from the phones and facebook and twitter. after thestory passing of senator daniel in a the washington times." host: the code of hawaii -- the governor of hawaii possibly been the replacement for daniel inouye, reported by cbs news. picking up on the remaining time and before the next senate, comes in. president obama spoke on friday and talked about the senator's service and h
they believed in this thing strongly. and he said, i'd rather have lost the entire election and won the soldiers' vote than won the election and lost the soldiers. >> what about the scene where you, where the amendment is in doubt, lincoln himself seems skeptical that they're going to make it, and seward has been pushing him to be careful, not to let it benown that he's around town trying to rouse up votes. and they're in the theater and mary lincoln turns -- well, let's look at it. >> you think i'm ignorant of what you're up to because you haven't discussed this scheme with me as you ought to have done. when have i ever been so easily bamboozled? i believe you when you insist that amending the constitution and abolishing slavery will end this war and since you are sending our son into the war, woe into you if you fail to pass the amendment. >> seward doesn't want me leaving big muddy footprints all over town. >> no one has ever lived who knows better than you the proper placement of footfalls on treacherous paths. seward can't do it. you must. because if you fail to acquire the necessary votes,
the queen, i believe as prime minister t morning after you won the election i believe that you're meeting was slight ackquard that a few things happened that weren't protocol. do you remember what happened. he says well what do they do in the film? so blair used the film that we had made up as a way to answer that question. so it's an extraordinary reversal of things. >> howard and david, so with both shows, with "homeland" now and with "24" in the past, were there actions with various government agencies particularly with terism with yourself and those agencies and did they respond at all to what was going on on in the show? >> no. they really were -- the show is so fundamentally propost rouse, the ood that so much could happen and have a middle and end in 24 shours fundamentally crazy and "homeland" deposit that is the cia is operating on our soil which as far as i know isn't happening. but there is emotional truth to the characters and our relationship with the military and count terism agencies. they were fans. they became fans of the show and they just kind of, we got calls from peop
expect going up to the elections? >> parliamentary elections will still show this division but i do not think the islamists will get the majority this time. the opposition is trying to unify itself and offer economic progress and that is what the muslim brotherhood is doing. they are leading moral discussions and the people know they cannot beat freedom or sharia law. >> he has been a hugely controversial figure. how you think he will emerge? stronger or weaker? >> he seems to be strong after the constitutional referendum, but i'm afraid you will get weaker. not able to bring egyptians together and if he will not lead to more division in the country. egypt is on the verge of economic collapse. they need a strong leadership which is having confidence in political issues and that is what the muslim brotherhood is not having right now. >> do you think mohamed morsi is capable to leave them out of the economic crisis? >> he is not the right man at the moment because he does not seem to be president of the egyptians. >> and egyptian author and political scientists living in germany. than
to italians to embrace the spirit of cooperation in upcoming elections. >> tens of thousands of people showed up in st. peter's square to hear benedict's message, and millions to and in worldwide. >> tens of thousands of people turned out to hear the pope's christmas message. the square erupted in applause as the pontiff stepped out to address the crowd. he revisited one of the themes of his christmas eve message -- the wish for peace in the middle east. turning and i to syria, he called for an end to the conflict -- turning an eye to syria. the pope appealed to those responsible to stop the bloodshed and slaughter of innocent people. he called for dialogue in order to find a political solution to the conflict. the pope then delivered a christmas message in 65 languages. >> remind the world that true happiness lies in their hearts with hope and joy, for the savior has been born for us. >> for many in the audience, hearing the message in their own language was an obvious highlight. then came the blessing -- to the city and to the world. >> we are joined now in our studio by our religious affai
a presidential election. the winner he was president already so he's been filtered for four years, but mitt romney. was he extremely filtered? >> guest: unfiltered without a doubt. in historical is not a lot of time in politics. had he won the presidency, he would've been second second only to wilson and arguably grover cleveland in terms of the shortness of his political career before he became president. >> host: well, listen, thank you. this is a fascinating books. alexis totino, the toes he says he don't know about it. >> guest: thank you very much. the fact that was, but tv signature programs in which authors are interviewed by policymakers, legislators and others familiar with their material. "after words" errors at 10:00 p.m. on saturday, 12:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" online. go to booktv.org and click on the booktv series and topics list on the upper right side of the page. >> historian harlow giles unger recounts the life of the six president, john quincy adams who died in 1840. quincy adams, second president had a long career, which aside fro
election that i think has huge potential to be participants and be excited about this program and young communities of color and different kinds of communities that before hadn't been as engaged, and it seems like a way to engage and educate those communities that really around social media, and i saw in here there is a big focus working with cbo's and operating their networks, but i would love to see something in here that social media is going to be maximized, what that looks like, whatever the plan is and i know for me and i'm not the emerging demographic and i'm not home much but to reach that constituency we have to maximize the tools which they respond to. i would love to see that as part of the plan. >> all right. we will highlight that more. we have a website. you're certainly aware of the public utilities commission twitter and facebook and other social media activities and cleanpower sf will certainly be engaging in all of those activities. i think maybe it could be highlighted better in the budget section certainly where we're talking about how we're funding some of this m
within your personal career as pirptions when you could have done more much this elective life and i know malia brought up the love for your family but some. our legislative staff have been waiting with shots to get the festivity started and so thank you sean for your years of service. >>> thank you very much mr. president i'll try to keep it brief and needless to say, i don't believe that sean elsburnd was the first people to endorse he for supervisor but, one of the things that, became very clear to my when i first got elected and started talking to colleagues on the board of supervisors was how seriously sean else person takes this job and i don't know that i fully appreciated how challenging this job can be. it's a job that really dmadle the very best of all of us to do this right besides the legislative work, the work that happens in terms of you know serving addressing the nuts and bolts of what happens in a neighborhood, what was so incredible about coming on the board and talking to sean was just learning from him how he approached it up you know that the fact that he saw this
of the ordinance by elected officials or department heads, but also those that come directly to us and don't go through the task force. is that right? >> i think this language was included just to make sure it was clear that any referral from the task force or in the off chance by the supervisor of record. this is not something that would come directly to the commission. >> but a referral, where the order of determination is a willful violation of a department head or an elected official would still go under chapter 3; right? >> correct. >> and this is just referring to allegations of non-willful. >> okay. >> so katherine is right in one aspect that the potential exists and the other part of this there was a concern that if something that staff was not a party of interest, if you will and a referral. so the only time that staff would be a party of interest is if we initiated the complaint and therefore, the executive director wouldn't have a role apart from providing you a legal recommendation on what was presented to him. that shows the intent of this. so that if a referral came allege
[inaudible] . >> thank you to supervisor avalos and i'm for the going anywhere i loss an election, i didn't die. so i'm still going to be out there and this weekend, i went to a bet thing and so who knows what my next ventures will be and i still have my oslo and scandinavian -- a farmling community in the central valuegee and so i think i is it have -- so if you are thinking what am i doing going to loss oh, in the middle of winter., you know i saw a film and never scoped my interest in scandinavian culture and is that doesn't take away at all to my comment and being proud of being latin and sevenning the latin community this past year and so i'm grateful to my supporter and is grateful to the residents of district five and i love the city and happy to have had the opportunity to serve on this board. a. (applause). . >> thank you supervisor olague. our final accommodation of the day will be to our second colleague local be leaving us today although he know he is not going far sean i have to say when i read the resolution that was draft of the to you today i was honestly bl
of people. i see many of you here that became family. you were there all the time, working on elections, and after my dad ran you helped my brother run. the same people helping us, being part of the family, working together for the city. i remember some of the crazy things we did growing up in political life. going to i think it's call -- i don't know if it's called the muni lot or parking lot and where the buss are in the morning so we could put a handout on every seat and bus that was there. i remember standing out in front of markets and it was raining and horrible and saying "will you vote for my dad" and milton loved this. he loved this energy and out of most of us and showed in what he ended up doing. all three kids learned at an early age giving to other people was one of the main things we were put on this world to do. our mom and dad taught us that. milton was a true believer sometimes to his detriment and would take on any power he needed to be even if it meant being fired from the board and "you're not doing enough. you're not raising enough money". he would take
it to the congress. the outcome of the election came before my book came out. but i was worried and i thought it was a legitimate concern in the senate should know about it. he said don't worry. he said you know, everybody knows that my father had an affair. and he said i know my father wasn't anti-semite. whatever you find whatever you rate is going to be sure for the man i knew and loved them without their. so i said okay. i want full access to everything. i want full access to the family, two of the documents, to everything stored it became belaboring boston but spend close to researchers. and you will see the book come to you in the family and your lawyers and representatives will see the book when it is between hard covers, not before. i won't be coming back to you for permission to cite anything. whatever i find them going to use in the book. he said okay. then it took 18 months to get the solid writing and i was off and running. and i found some more remarkable story that i even imagined i would find. i found the story of a man who spent his life moving back and forth have been an outs
year in election campaigns. melissa: but still you said tax breaks. that is tax breaks that is their money hanging on to. it is not money they're getting back from congress. it is their money. >> it is money that everyone else has to pay. you know they get a special tax break for, for instance, if they want to make a project internationally they have a special government-backed loan program at u.s. export import bank. last year that program alone provided $10.4 billion fossil fuel subsidies. melissa: can i ask you better for my children and went out like the navy and spent $26 a gallon on biofuels or the air force which is spending $59 a gallon would that be better for my children we were all doing it. i don't like the air force and navy doing that. that is bad for my children's future because it runs up the deficit. >> the best thing for my children's future, i have two boys, one 10 years, one ten months and i'm worried about climate change and their future. we need to stop encouraging industry causing this problem, oil industry, gas and coal industries, and need to st
career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was st
's elections committee has said it will announce on tuesday the official results off of votes on the constitution. nearly 2/3 of egyptians voted in favor of the draft charter. >> from the beginning the national salvation front said this constitution does not represent the people. this constitution is not one of national consensus, but of national division. our position is to fight and until we change this constitution and replace it with another. >> iny and, two senior policeman have been suspended in connection with the gang rape of a student on a bus in new delhi. they said they failed to carry out their duties. protests are continuing despite police crackdowns. >> undeterred by the block aids in high security, protesters took the streets in new delhi for another day. authorities shot roads and metro stations to try to keep the crowds under control. these demonstrations have taken on a momentum of their own. the protests have spread to at least five other states in india including mumbai and bang lower. -- langelor. the prime minute stir addressed the nation promising his go
of making the city safe and her that is pretty much of purpose of this committee as well. and the election, that you just experienced was something that was really troubling for me as well. that there was a large amount of money at the end of the election was thrown in and used domestic violence as a tool and a wedge to split you from would be supporters as well. and i thought that was troubling based especially because of your experience and history working in the field. so, i'm actually going to be putting my name on this as a co-sponsor for this resolution as well. and i look forward to working with domestic violence community in years to come to make the city a safer place. >> can i just say that i strongly stand behind my colleagues, supervisor olague and comments and sentiments and when a coalition group comes to my office to bring resolutions forward or ordinances i am in total solid tarty with the organizations that bring it to me. if they ask for certain people to be on the resolutions i abide by that with them. i disagreed with their request to pull you off of the resolution. and
elected i have always appreciated that you have mentoring those of us who are entering into the field after you and not a lot of elected officials do that to give their advise and support and i appreciate the support that you have given to me and i also want to say that i have an incredible apt of respect fortitude you have and the honesty and the way you carry yourself as-woman and a woman leader and it's rare to see that type of leadership and those of us in this field admire those qualities about and you see how incredible you have moving through a lot of different types of politics and fundraisings and lots of other things and so i want to thank you again for being that role-model and i appreciate what you have done. >> supervisor kim, i also want to add a few words for myself. fee i don't evenna you [spelling?] you main annoy you are the first asian america supervisor that i got know when i was a community activist and i appreciate your words of wisdom done and encouragement for all of the work that we do here and i also want to take a moment to colleagues remind
commission. :good evening dale pillpa, just wanted to comment and perhaps inquire on the election season that has just concluded. i assume that the staff will be analyzing the effectiveness of the matching -- the public finance program and perhaps compiling a report and i'm just wondering what the thinking is on the timing for that? it's usually a few months down the road, but given the various things that happened this cycle, i believe it will be interesting to look at the numbers after the fact and maybe we can have some discussion at that time about the program and how it works given what we anticipated about a year-ago going into this cycle. i don't know if staff has an indication of when that mike be happening. >> a few months. >> thanks. next item on the agenda is discussion and possible action on the amendments to the ordinance. >> nobody is a stranger to the subject matter in front of us. the commission made some progress and combing through input from the sunshine ordinance task force and the staff's updated and redirected recommendations and then once again, after the last
pleasure to introduce the president elect of the bar association of san francisco. they provide conflict attorneys to handle cases when a defender is not available. >> i am the president elect of the bar association. we're very proud to co-sponsor the justice of it. on behalf of the 8000 members, and all of those who -- dedicate their careers -- we are very fortunate to have his leadership with top-notch legal representation. for those who were charged each year who are innocent. an important part of the mission is providing equal access to justice. this is shared by his office and all the public defenders. we're proud of the conflict panel that he described, and we also provide the top-notch representation in matters that his office cannot handle. we applaud you for what you do and for those of you who could not make it, thank you very much. this year's public defender simon will be an interesting day, full of cutting edge issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me becaus
heads and elected officials. i know i've seen some of you here. thank you for coming out to support the fund workover our city employees. it is a privilege to me in particular to be here because i have had the opportunity for the last several years to be on the selection committee for the good government awards. it is really a treat. as a human-resources director, i get a lot of bad news. some of that gets in the newspaper. with all due respect to our brethren in the press, it's always a good story to write about bad behavior that may happen in a city department or that a public employee may have engaged in. we are the largest employer in san francisco. it is only natural as some of that bad behavior may fall on our doorsteps. it is refreshing to see some of the wonderful work people are doing, who really personify the ethos of san francisco. i want to celebrate that. on behalf of the mayor, thank you. please do your part to extend your appreciation to those people. it was a very difficult process. the community members who are involved in the selection process, as we know, we had g
why that many people are living like that. elections and we have a new government. a lot of it is promised has not come through. but people have individual efforts and how, in some ways -- they have picked themselves up last week that they can. but it is a question that we have to keep asking and something that we have to model allows people to get that for example, hurricane sandy 80 people are not happy with what he something like that that inner-city when you are living in a tent. there is something like 74,000 acres of land we are still going dealing with a very urgent and difficult situation in haiti. >> host: where did your book, "so spoke the earth" come from? >> guest: it came from women writers of haitian descent. it is the navigation of patients to tell their stories and these groups of women, the edited this anthology. it is "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know." different women talk about this. it is a trilingual anthology in english, french, and creole. it's generational. we talk about the people who were surviving
and eisenhower had such a feud after the 1952 election. until the kennedy assassination. they find themselves sharing a ride together back from the funeral. in that atmosphere, that's when you bury the hatchet. truman said, you want to come up for a drink? and the two end up spending the afternoon and evening drinking together and reuniting. >> and in this what do i do now moment as presidents explains after they leave they're so much more forgiving of those who come after them. like he said, i don't believe our country should undermine our president. that's an astonishing thing in our day and age for a republican president to say about a democratic president, yet he said that. it's very much similar to to what ike said about kennedy. in some ways what reagan even said about carter. so -- at moments. so that's really astonishing understanding, sympathy. >> so let's talk about some of the things that this book uncovers. i can't wait to get doris' take on this. we have to start with the lbj/nixon interaction. and it's sort of like two people holding guns at each other's face. i mean -- >> doubl
hello, tom. it is exciting times in tripoli. with election and new congress coming together. as i read libya's recent history it is a bit like we are reliving the post world war ii years. how right he was. that was chris. always thinking, always sharp, always ready. public service is too often looked down upon by some in this country. often my colleagues in the foreign service la meant they don't make them the way they used to anymore. today we remember a man, chris stevens, whose life and service just proves how wrong my colleagues really are. chris shows us they still make them the way they used to, only an awful lot better, thank you. [applause] >> chris's family would like to invite everyone to a reception after the ceremony. it will be held over there. you are all welcome. let us pray. oh lord, support us all the day long until the shadows lengthen and the evening comes and the busy world is hushed and the fever of life is over and our work is done. then in your mercy grant us a safe lodging and a holy rest and peace at the last. may the author of all life bless us and keep us. in
of your adult life to fighting crime and trying to make communities safer as the elected district attorney of san francisco, you've committed yourself to that, and yet you've broken away from the position held by, i believe, every other elected district attorney in california to support marar district attorney in califoia to support senator leno's direction. why is that? >> i want to thank marty for being here. even though we disagree, i think it was really important to have the point of view of the 57 other elected d.a.'s in the state. i think it's important to understand in our dialogue so marty, thank you for being here. >> thank you. >> marty is someone i respect a great deal and he has been involved in public safety for a number of years and doing very momably serving the l.a. city attorney as well as his current position. actually, for me this has been a journey, it's not like a light switch went on yesterday. i have been involved in public safety for about 30 years. i have seen the war on drugs from the ground up. i have seen it as a police officer, young police officer walking, foo
elected civilian that lived in the white house. mcclellan himself toyed with the idea of. quote, i almost think if i were to win a small success now i could become teeter. he wrote to his wife. and he andy gloried in his newspaper nickname, the young napoleon. he then posed for official photographs with his hands tucked into his tunic. added cabinet meeting on new year's eve, the joint congressional committee on the conduct of the war spent more than 90 minutes asking hard questions about the situation and lincoln's answers left everyone shocked and unnerved. afterwards, attorney general edward bates setup into the night filling page after page of his diary. quote, the secretary of war and the president are kept in ignorance of the actual condition of the army and its intended movements bates confided. the blame he concluded lay with abraham lincoln. an excellent man wrote bates and in the main wise but he lacks will and purpose and i greatly fear he has not the power to command. over the next 12 months, the civil war became a cataclysm. the federal government became a -- in the confedera
to feel our elected efficients make our needs and it's in physical presence and i have had the great pleasure of serving under our mayor lee who i would like to make a invite to make a few remarks in honor or of arab heritage month here in san francisco. >> thank you, thank you joaquin, thank you, welcome to our orange city hall. i want to welcome everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now, i ask you also to bring me talent from the arab america communities to make me and help me lune run the city. yes, it's incredible. union, i think i can talk about how wonderful diversity is, but we have to get the talent from our communities to represent all of the different thing that we do in the city. and you know, tonight, even though there is something calle
in the wake of the elections, a lot of critics of republicans said, the republican party in particular need to be more supportive of immigrants, have some kind of path to citizenship. your legislation doesn't go that far. should it go further and why is it important to make at least some steps in the direction of helping people become more fully integrated into society? >> well, first of all we do welcome immigrants because there is a way to come into our country legally. what we're dealing with is people who have come illegally and in this case they are children who really didn't have a choice. and they are here and they have been educated in america and we're trying to give them a legal status that doesn't allow am fear of deportation. allows them go to college or go to school and stay here if they want to. if they want to become citizens, they can apply and get in line and abide by the law as it is today. we don't change the law. we don't prohibit them. but we don't give them the cut in line before the people who have it withed for years to get that green card or citizenship. gerri: i wa
the question at the heart of the election that the world wanted the answer to. is the united states capable of serious course correction? and i think both on november the sixth and in the so-called fiscal clef, sokol negotiations that followed, we are telling the world that the united states is not capable of serious course correction, and that will have catastrophic consequences for america. lou: when you say catastrophic consequences, tonight it seems as if we are, this broadcast has been organized to prove your point. bill archer joined us, former house ways and means committee in 1996 who was president at almost the destruction of the government under president clinton and speaker gingrich. we have hisexperience, also the experience as a member of the budget commission put together by president clinton which came to nothing. just as the simpson bowles commission came to nothing. and as this fiscal clef being managed by his president does t look promising. >> that is really the point you brought up earlier. when you have european levels of spending which we now have come up you have tra
after political scientists say the time between election day nov. inauguration day is 11 weeks, that is too short a time for a president to get ready to assume office. lyndon johnson had two hours and six minutes in which he was sworn in on the plane, air force one, let's get airborne and landed in washington. he had to get off of the plane, ready to be president of the united states. to see him step in with no preparation at all, when president kennedy's legislative program, civil rights and every one of his other major bills as well was stalled by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress as they had been controlling it for a quarter of the century, to see him get the program up and running, ramming it through to what lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination is a lesson in what a president can do if he now knows all of the levers to pull, but has the will, lyndon johnson's case, almost vicious drive to do it to win, to say over and over again as i am always saying to myself when i am doing the research, look what he is doing here.
election. on november 6th president obama beat republican rival mitt romney to win a second term. what other stories topped the list and what do they tell us about the world we live in today. john fund is a columnist for "national review magazine" he joins us to weigh in on this. john, good to see you. merry christmas to you. >> thank you. kelly: we hope you're doing well. we know the top story was the election, it was a bitter fight to the end, president obama winning re-election. what does it tell us, though, about the campaign of mitt romney, and the mood of the country then, because we had so many other big stories affect the outcome of the election. >> well, this election, i think, was a very curious one, because president obama made some history. normal lee an incumbent with an economy that weak and no particular prospects of it getting better wouldn't have won re-election. but president obama was able to take advantage of i think dramatic stumbles on the part of mitt romney, the 47% line and various other things, absolutely. kelly: does it surprise you that mitt romney's people
. on november 4 before the election, you posted on facebook, "why would anyone jobless today vote to maintain the status quo instead of change? unemployment is still higher than four years ago." what are your thoughts on president obama's re-election, i would say to you? were you saying to people if you are jobless today the president has failinged you and you should vote against him and vote for change in the presidency? >> well, what i was saying was the old recovery -- mantra, to do the same thing over and over and over and expect different change is called insanity. we spent $2 billion on an election that nothing changed. same congress, same senate same president. so should we expect change? i'm not that sure. >> therefore the re-election of president obama was a good thing or bad thing you think? >> well, i don't ever get into politics as you know, charlie. i've always said i'm not right wing or left wing, i'm for the whole bird. >> evidently, god wanted president obama, he had a purpose for him, to be re-elected. do i follow that? what's the disconnect between those t
to what some have said that is not at all why you were not elected. the sheriff was a very popular and well-respected supervisor, and our district strongly supported his reinstatement. your vote to reinstate him actually earned you votes and significantly increased your support in the district. i want to go on record speaking as a domestic violence survivor for myself and others we know your vote does not mean you condone or minimize the scourge of domestic violence but demonstrates your ability to vote on fact and law rather than emotion. the attacks on you were some pr consultant -- to make a false -- against you. you can leave office with your head held high knowing you did the morally and legally correct thing. the attacks on you have highlighted just how ha rampant racism is. one of the values you have taught me was about servant leadership and that is why i'm sure the right was galvanized to defeat you. they knew your -- >> president chiu: thank you very much. next speaker. >> good evening, supervisors. david elliott lewis. i'm here to thank supervisor olague for her service.
. pizza hut election question at the top of your last. they tried to g people to stand up at the debate and ask whether we like pepperoni year cheese. was that pepperoni or sauces? >> pepperoni your sauces. they wanted someone to stand up in the town of the bay between the president and the governor before the election and when they got to ask a question to ask, do you prefer your pizza with sausage or pepperoni. think about not only what the baldheaded move that was, but how incredibly disrespectful it is, not just of the two guys who were up there. melissa: they went back on it, so you gives him some credit. mercedes-benz using -- well was the deal with that? >> this one is hard to believe. they used him in a presentation, and on his beady instead of the redstart they had the merced logo. i know what happened, they had a twentysomething art director the only time years she had ever seen was on a t-shirt and a river something. no, if you want to sit or revolutionary, let's use a revolutionary. however, it was a little bit close to people's hearts, and it's not like we used somebody fro
the slow road to election day, beginning with a primary season that often felt like one long "snl" sketch. >> and the -- what's the third one there? i love this state. i love the lakes. i love cars. i like being able to fire people. 10,000 bucks? >> becky, becky. >> today has been awesome, girl. >> i made a lot of money. >> what a snob. >> let me leave you with this -- i believe these words came from the pokemon movie. >> laugh if you will, but early versions of the gettysburg address also name checked pokemon. before we move to the general election, we should check in with the tanning mom. >> i mean, that's not normal. >> #jerseypride. on to the presidential campaign. before we do that, do we have that chinese lady vanishing into a sidewalk? there she is. one more and i swear we'll move on. can i please get the guy who turned his deceased stuffed cat into a remote-control aircraft? against the backdrop of that controversial dead cat drone program, president obama sought re-election in a campaign where we finally got the sophisticated adult political debate we've longed for. >> it would b
is stepping up efforts to lift the nation's sagging economy. he said the landslide election victory signals the party's hope to regain a strong japan. >> translator: i think a wide variety of policies including monetary policy should be implemented to get the economy back on track. they will together help trigger economic growth again. >> he also expressed his support for abe's plan to restore the council on economic and fiscal policy. the panel was closed under the noda administration. >>> an afghan police woman has shot and killed an american civilian adviser in afghanistan. the incident is the latest in a string of attacks in the country by local soldiers and police. our correspondent in bangkok has the examples. >>> the attack occurred in kabul on monday. the police woman was immediately detained following the incident. the motive behind the shooting is not clear. a female officer of the local police force approached and shot dead an american who was working as a security advisor at police headquarters and in a separate incident a police officer shot and killed five colleagues in the no
to read because it is, it's an emergency book. i wanted it to come out before the election. it's a brief history of racial demagoguery, from the left, and to point out that it's never produced whitefield is only produced disaster, heartbreak, crime, death. it has been a disaster for america. most of all for black people, and to the point of it is to say don't fall for white guilt again, america. the last time you fell for it was in 2008, and look what that produced. so don't fall for it again but don't make the same mistake again. and also i think it's a fun book to read. most of it will be stored you have never read before. thank you and i will sign your books now. [applause] >> is this yours? >> know, that's a mine. >> thanks. thank you. are you leaving? >> i have to. spent it's your fault we didn't get to mingle. >> i know. i'm sorry. >> i got to come back to d.c. that's all i'm getting from you? >> you already got enough from me. spent i was just telling my friend how i tell all the whippersnappers, you hang on islands everywhere. you was the one and you just don't even care about th
. anyway fast forward three and a half years newly elected mayor he asks me to be the director of emergency services and i really didn't want to do it because of what i have seen and he went to my house and my wife wanted to. >> >> live in san francisco so my goose was cooked. i took over the job and i planned to return to the east coast. there was one staff member, no vehicles, no money, no nothing, and through the good efforts of a director of public works at the time they built seismically configured foundations and they brought in double wides and built the interim emergency command center which is the community building over there and that was where we were. no furniture, no telephones, no nothing. i came the first day and ask where is the command center? it's in construction. it's that area in the park and you have one employee. she's not really yours. she was the mayor's pir, public relations person, and she's been -- apparently that was siberia for seem for people from the mayor's office so anyway -- i mean you have to tell it like said mr. mayor. when you take a job like th
of the buttresses being worked on over of the last period. the contractor has elected to put in a sheet pile cutoff wall in the north-south division on division between zones 2 and 3 on eastside of the fremont street. this will allow them to start the excavation underneath the fremont street bridge and start moving into that zone 4 portion of that zone 4 excavation early before the completion of buttress work. so that shoring wall went in or that cutoff wall went in this last period and will allow them to start excavating under the bridge. the awss work continues. as i mentioned there is just a couple of shots of the work progressing on mission street and the integral work around the other utilitis in the streets. so next up is the substructure package as i mentioned. so we'll just walk through that real quick. the shoring walls are already completed. you might have seen the slides before, the water table. the next step is the micro piles and there are a total of close to 1800 of them, the length of the project, but as they are completed the contractor, who is starting with the grounding and geo
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